Woman consulting library books

RESEARCH LIBRARY

This library features a subset of NBME research, which includes over 1,500 publications dating back to 1923. Check back as we continue to add both new and previously published research. 

View All Publications
Showing 1 - 3 of 3 Research Library Publications
Posted: March 1, 2019 | D. Jurich, M. Daniel, M. Paniagua, A. Fleming, V. Harnik, A. Pock, A. Swan-Sein, M. A. Barone, S.A. Santen

Academic Medicine: March 2019 - Volume 94 - Issue 3 - p 371-377

 

Schools undergoing curricular reform are reconsidering the optimal timing of Step 1. This study provides a psychometric investigation of the impact on United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores of changing the timing of Step 1 from after completion of the basic science curricula to after core clerkships.

Posted: March 1, 2019 | J. Salt, P. Harik, M. A. Barone

Academic Medicine: March 2019 - Volume 94 - Issue 3 - p 314-316

 

The United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS) exam uses physician raters to evaluate patient notes written by examinees. In this Invited Commentary, the authors describe the ways in which the Step 2 CS exam could benefit from adopting a computer-assisted scoring approach that combines physician raters’ judgments with computer-generated scores based on natural language processing (NLP).

Posted: June 1, 2018 | P. Harik, B. E. Clauser, I. Grabovsky, P. Baldwin, M. Margolis, D. Bucak, M. Jodoin, W. Walsh, S. Haist

Journal of Educational Measurement, 55: 308-327

 

The widespread move to computerized test delivery has led to the development of new approaches to evaluating how examinees use testing time and to new metrics designed to provide evidence about the extent to which time limits impact performance. Much of the existing research is based on these types of observational metrics; relatively few studies use randomized experiments to evaluate the impact time limits on scores. Of those studies that do report on randomized experiments, none directly compare the experimental results to evidence from observational metrics to evaluate the extent to which these metrics are able to sensitively identify conditions in which time constraints actually impact scores. The present study provides such evidence based on data from a medical licensing examination.